Classical Sunday: Elgar’s “The Dream of Gerontius”

“This is the best of me. This, if anything of me, is worth your memory.” ~  Sir Edward Elgar.

2 comments

Sir Andrew Davis conducts “The Dream of Gerontius”, a poem written by the Blessed Cardinal John Henry Newman, and set to music by Sir Edward Elgar.

Recorded at St. Paul’s Cathedral in London, England, in 1997.

“This is the best of me. This, if anything of me, is worth your memory.”

~  Sir Edward Elgar.

Part 1

 

Part 2

 

Philip Langridge – Gerontius
Catherine Wyn-Rogers – Angel
Alastair Miles – Priest/ Angel of the Agony
Sir Andrew Davis conducts BBC Symphony Orchestra and Chorus.

The Dream of Gerontius:  The Poem

About the poem

2 comments on “Classical Sunday: Elgar’s “The Dream of Gerontius””

  1. What a wonderful choice! And what a wonderful performance too. I remember watching and listening to it live on the BBC. I learnt yesterday in programme notes at a concert that I was attending that the Birmingham Festival, who eventually commissioned Elgar, first offered Newman’s text to Dvorak, who did not like it. I am so glad that eventually it came to Elgar. The words and the music poured out of his heart. It always touches mine, every time I hear it.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Thank you, it is indeed such a wonderful poem and composition. Elgar himself was moved by his own work, which surely is a good reason to devote some time to this particular piece. Haunting really, is what I thought when I first heard it. It will be running here for the next couple of weeks, no doubt, until we can all really appreciate what poured out of the hearts of both writer and composer there…

    Like

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