Remembering Our Ancestors: Mattie Mulford

The Mulfords go way back to French Royalty including Charlemagne, and on into the Roman times, if you can believe it.

5 comments

Today, our (2nd) great-grandmother Mattie Mulford would have celebrated her 135th birthday.  The Mulfords go way back to French Royalty including Charlemagne, and on into the Roman times, if you can believe it.  How proven this ancestry line is, doesn’t really matter to us:  It has provided us with numerous history lessons over the course of the past few years one way or another.

Mattie Mulford was born on 3 May 1884, in Beech Hill, Mason County, West Virginia, along the Kanawha River.  Her parents, George Mulford and Arilla Harris, were both from families that settled in America in the first half of the 17th century, with Arilla being a direct descendant of Captain Thomas Harris, who came to the Jamestown Colony from England in 1611, while the Mulfords came to Long Island in 1645.  George and Arilla had 10 children, of which Mattie was the fourth.  When she died at the age of 58, she was living in Southside, WV, only a 10-minute drive from the place where she was born.

Last month we remembered Mattie’s husband Steward Leslie Denney; the two married on 3 October 1899 in Mason County, West Virginia.  They raised 14 children in 26 years, and one of them was our (great-) grandfather Lorain Franklin Denney.

grave marker Mattie Mulford
Mattie May Mulford Denney 1884–1937

Mattie Mulford died on April 10, 1937, in her hometown, at the age of 52, and was buried in Pine Grove Cemetery, Southside, West Virginia.

Rest in Peace, (2nd) Great-Grandma Mattie.

The featured image shows the confluence of the Kanawha and Ohio Rivers at Point Pleasant, West Virginia, which lies north-west of Beech Hill and Southside.

5 comments on “Remembering Our Ancestors: Mattie Mulford”

    1. Thank you. ☺ Finally we got some, too. Spring sprang late here in terms of temperatures, and so everything seems to be blooming late. We are all very glad for the additional color.

      Like

    1. Yes, it surely is. Makes it easier to remember things as well if a grandpa, aunt or cousin from a couple of generations back was directly involved. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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