Poesie: Blake’s Hear the Voice of the Bard

A Bard used to be much more than a mere wordsmith.

2 comments

Hear the Voice of the Bard

Hear the voice of the Bard!
Who present, past, and future sees;
Whose ears have heard
The Holy Word,
That walked among the ancient trees,

Calling the lapsed soul,
And weeping in the evening dew;
That might control
The starry pole,
And fallen, fallen, light renew!

‘O Earth, O Earth, return!
Arise from out the dewy grass;
Night is worn,
And the morn
Rises from the slumberous mass.

‘Turn away no more;
Why wilt thou turn away?
The starry floor,
The watery shore,
Is given thee till the break of day.’

~ William Blake

DSCN0053 - Edited.jpg

In medieval Gaelic and Welsh society, a bard was a professional poet, employed to compose eulogies for his lord. In other Indo-European societies, the same function was fulfilled by skalds, rhapsodes, minstrels and scops, among others.  A hereditary caste of professional poets in Proto-Indo-European society has been reconstructed by comparison of the position of poets in medieval Ireland and in ancient India in particular.  Bards were those who sang the songs recalling tribal history, family history and genealogies in Celtic societies.  The pre-Christian Celtic peoples maintained an intricate oral history committed to memory and transmitted by bards.

 

William Blake (28 November 1757 – 12 August 1827) was an English poet, painter, and printmaker.  Largely unrecognised during his lifetime, Blake is now considered one of the most important poets and visual artists of the Romantic Age.

2 comments on “Poesie: Blake’s Hear the Voice of the Bard”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.